CART

CALIFORNIA ARTISTS RADIO THEATRE

A BIT OF OUR HISTORY

Bradbury, Webber
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Astin, Shatner
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Henning, McDowall
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Leviathan, Legionaire, Wynant
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Rockwell, Whitmore
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Easterbrook
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IMG_0448
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Worley, Webber
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McDougall, Herd
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Tony Palermo
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Windom, Nye, Auberjonois
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McDowall, Eggar
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Kaplan
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CART001
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Legionaire, Easterbrook
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In 1984, after more than forty years as a radio, television, film and theatre actress-director-producer, Peggy Webber began her quest to revive radio drama and to help encourage young people to enjoy the spoken word. Her past work with directors such as Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, Norman Corwin and Jack Webb, prepared and inspired her for the challenge. The early CART radio shows were broadcast over KUSC where, after the first production of Treasure Island, there were three hundred calls to the station requesting more.

The initial CART company began working on Peggy's TV productions in 1944. In 1989, The Charles Kurault CBS Sunday Morning show presented excerpts of the CART company, from rehearsal to show-time, performing A Tribute to Abraham Lincoln. The show contained scenes from The Rivalry and Ann Rutledge, written and directed by Norman Corwin.

San Francisco's television station, KPIX, filmed an excerpt from CART's The Importance of Being Earnest as part of the statewide television series California Trails.

On the 75th Birthday Tribute to Ray Bradbury, NBC's The Today Show, as well as Canadian and international networks, filmed portions of the production.

During the production of the broadcast of Salman Rushdie's Satanic Verses, five local television stations covered the live CART broadcast

CART programs have been heard by public audiences on Los Angeles radio stations KUSC, KPCC, and KPFK, and one hundred were broadcast on NPR and public radio for twelve years. Internationally, CART contracted with World Space to send 40 hours of programming to Africa, South America, and Asia.